Old School Sound with New Age Swag

Missy Dee

Brooklyn’s Lovehoney is a flashback to the seventies, combining the blues, funk, soul, and classic rock into their sound.

Lovehoney is a unique band.

They cannot be lumped into one, specific genre or style. Where then, do they fit in?

The Brooklyn rockers are bluesy, yet funky. They’re loud and gritty, yet catchy and groovy. They’re classic rock, yet have a hip, authentic aura about them. Lovehoney combines the perfect concoction of honoring the forefathers of rock, all the while maintaining a new-age swagger. Think Black Sabbath infused with The Black Keys, or a mixture of Led Zeppelin and Funkadelic, but with some Alabama Shakes sprinkled in.

Listening to Lovehoney is like taking a time machine back to 1975, which comes to no surprise considering their musical inspiration and background.

Lead guitarist Tommy White cites the blues and soul music of decades prior, as the band’s primarily influence. This, in turn, led the group toward classic rock.  

For us, being musicians that appreciate soul, blues, and rock, especially that of the 60’s and 70’s, had a lot to do with our style,” said White. “I feel like classic rock is the best of both worlds. It’s heavy and soulful. When it came time to write music together, it all happened naturally.”

“Heavy and soulful” is evident in Lovehoney’s latest three-song EPs, DIG This! and Call Me (both released in 2018). If “loud and funky” better suits your taste, try their 2017 EP, Feelin’ No Way, featuring “Try to Get Rid of Me,” which is the perfect title for the track, as its catchy riff will remain in your head for hours upon end. This makes for a rather satisfying day, if you ask me.

Lovehoney’s authenticity not only shines in their style, but also through their lead singer, Alysia Quinones.

Quinones, who is of Puerto Rican, Guyanese, and Surinamese descent, takes pride in her background, and hopes to be a role model for younger girls of the demographic.

“I definitely feel like I can motivate or spark a plug in my beautiful, brown community of women, to want to create rock n’ roll,” said Quinones. “There are a few of us floating around, but it would be amazing to see more ethnic female representation in the rock scene. Who knows, maybe I can help open up that portal. It’s already in our history, why can’t we bring it back?”

Quinones’ raw vocals are put on full display with the band’s first EP, Devil Woman. She shows off her range, going for power with “Devil Woman” and “I’m Gone,” but changes pace by slowing it down for the smooth, serenading “Beauty in the Struggle.” Quinones has a pure, powerful voice, but at the same time, slightly distorts it, for a “Black Keys” sounding effect.

Lovehoney’s overall sound makes for a brilliant live performance, perfect for a intimate club setting. White says the band is passionate about their stage presence and pride themselves on their live performance. Artists that Lovehoney admired, such as Howlin’ Wolf, Free, and Jimi Hendrix, always put on an excellent live show, which is what the band tries to emulate.

“We love feeding off the energy of one another because in the moment, so many great things can happen spontaneously that could never happen in the studio—the vibe is different,” said White. “It’s icing on the cake when the audience is into it. Our main goal is to make them feel everything they heard on the record, but on an even greater artistic level, that can only happen in the moment.”

For now, the band is sticking around the local New York scene, but plan to play gigs in Nashville, Los Angeles, and the U.K. next year.

While it’s difficult to pinpoint an exact genre for Lovehoney, they definitely have a “classic rock” vibe to their sound. This comes to no shock with their aforementioned influences.

White, however, feels that classic rock is making a much-needed comeback, largely crediting the resurgence of vinyl records and live music.

“More stores are now carrying records, so you see reissues of Hendrix and Zeppelin and other classic rock giants on the shelves,” said White. “This creates a chain reaction of people now wanting to go and listen to their catalogs. I feel like people are just tired of all the overly processed, computer-created music. You can sense that people want to hear live instruments again and actually see people play them.”

White also admires what several modern day artists are doing for the classic rock renaissance.

“I really like what Greta Van Fleet is trying to do. It’s apparent they have an admiration for 60’s and 70’s rock,” said White.  “I also dig Benjamin Booker, you can hear blues, soul, and rock delivered in his own way.”

Regardless of where Lovehoney fits in musically, they are helping the push for a resurgence of classic rock.

Interested in Lovehoney? Follow them here.

Facebook

Instagram

Spotify

Website

YouTube

 

Mark is a writer for Super Metal World, as well as an avid supporter of live music and vinyl records. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @MarkRadlund, or send him an email at [email protected].